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CRIMINAL DEFENSE ATTORNEYS GRAND RAPIDS MICHIGAN

CALL FOR A FREE PHONE CONSULTATION WITH A CRIMINAL DEFENSE ATTORNEY AT 616-459-6636.

The Grand Rapids criminal defense attorneys at Krupp Law Offices PC can answer your questions. When you are facing serious criminal charges in the Grand Rapids area, it is important to have the representation of a good criminal defense attorney. Krupp Law Offices PC has been providing quality criminal defense for over 95 years. If you are facing criminal charges or are being investigated, call the criminal defense attorneys at Krupp Law Offices PC for a free phone consultation. During your phone consultation, our attorneys will provide you with immediate answers to your questions and schedule an appointment with one of our criminal defense attorneys.

Who you choose to represent you in court matters!! Whether you have already been arrested, a targeted suspect in a police investigation, facing a criminal warrant, or charged with misdemeanor or felony offense, remember to say NOTHING to the police and call the Grand Rapids Criminal Defense Attorneys at Krupp Law Offices PC immediately. Krupp Law Offices PC can defend you and protect your rights!  You can trust the 95 years of experience and skills of Aggressive Grand Rapids Criminal Defense Attorneys at Krupp Law Offices PC to defend your case in court!

A criminal conviction can have serious life-altering consequences. Do not attempt to fight the criminal system alone. Our firm has been highly recognized in the legal community as one of the best Criminal Defense Attorneys in Grand Rapids. Call Aggressive Grand Rapids Criminal Defense Lawyer Krupp Law Offices PC Today for free case evaluation, if you have been arrested and jailed.

 

HOW MUCH DOES A GRAND RAPIDS CRIMINAL ATTORNEY COST?

Typical fees to retain attorney for a crminal case is dependent on the seriousness of the offense. Fees can range and from 1,500.00 dollars to as high as 25,000 dollars. Considering the seriousness of this life changing event, it is extremely important to retain the services of an experienced attorney in criminal law.

HOW EXPERIENCED ARE THE GRAND RAPIDS CRIMINAL ATTORNEYS AT KRUPP LAW?

Our Attorneys have over 95 years of criminal defense experience. Our lawyers have extensive criminal defense experience. Finding the right attorney for you is one of the most important decisions you can face. Krupp Law Offices P.C. has an attorney that can aggressively represent you in your criminal case.

HOW DO I GET A CRIMINAL DEFENSE ATTORNEY FROM KRUPP LAW STARTED?

Getting your criminal defense started is easy - Just call our office. You can speak with a Grand Rapids Criminal Defense Attorney at Krupp law for free. We will answer all your questions.  We will also schedule an appointment to meet in our office. If you are out of state or can not get away from work, we will do a phone interview. We also have an online interview questionare that can help get you going.

It is important that you feel comfortable with the criminal defense attorney that you interview and ultimately hire. This is a time when you need straight talk from an honest criminal defense attorney. Beware of the criminal defense lawyer that tells you what you want to hear and makes unrealistic promises about the out come of the situation.

If you are facing a felony or a misdemeanor, a good criminal defense attorney is not optional, it is a requirement! Our criminal defense attorneys can answer your questions with straight talk. Having the right criminal defense attorney on your side can relieve your stress during this difficult situation. Our criminal defense attorneys have over 85 years of criminal defense experience. George Krupp is a former Kent County assistant prosecutor and current criminal defense attorney. Christian Krupp is a former Jackson County assistant prosecutor and current criminal defense attorney. Between the two criminal defense attorneys, they can provide you with excellent criminal defense representation. Both attorneys have extensive criminal defense trial experience including murder, negligent homicide, criminal sexual conduct (CSC), possession with intent to deliver cocaine, drunk driving, and other serious crimes.

Krupp Law Offices P.C. is located in downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan and has the right criminal defense attorney for you. We represent clients in all criminal matters throughout West Michigan, including the cities of Grand Rapids, Holland, and Grand Haven, and the counties of Kent, Ottawa, Allegan, Barry, Newaygo, Montcalm, Muskegon, and Ionia.

 

Call for a free phone consultation. Our office can help.

KRUPP LAW OFFICES P.C.

161 Ottawa NW Suite 404

Grand Rapids MI 49503

616-459-6636 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

OTHER CRIMINAL LAW TOPICS:

Expungement - Criminal Record

Expungement - Juvenile Record

Miranda Warnings

Arson - MCLA 750.71

Assualt - MCLA 750.81

Attempt - MCLA 750.91

NSF Check - MCLA 750.131

Breaking & Entering MCLA 750.110

UDAA - Stolen Car

Conspiracy

Criminal Sexual Conduct

Drug Offenses

Embezzlement

Explosives

Extortion

Failure to Pay Child Support

Firearms

Fire Crimes

Disorderly Conduct

Forgery & Conterfeiting

Gambling

Indecent Exposure

Kidnapping

Larceny

Malicious Destruction of Property

Murder Homicide

Perjury

Stolen Property

Robbery | Car Jacking

Criminal Attorney, Grand Rapids Criminal Defense Attorney, Criminal Attorneys, Grand Rapids Criminal Attorney, Grand Rapids Criminal Defense, Criminal Defense Attorney Grand Rapids, Criminal Lawyer Grand Rapids, Grand Rapids Criminal Defense Lawyers
 

GRAND RAPIDS CRIMINAL DEFENSE ATTORNEY - MIRANDA WARNINGS

When you are facing criminal charges in the Grand Rapids area and you made statements to the police about teh alleged crime, it is important to have the representation of a good criminal defense lawyer. Krupp Law Offices P.C. has been providing quality criminal defense for over 85 years. If you are facing serious criminal charges or are being investigated for a crime, call the criminal defense attorneys at Krupp Law Offices for a free phone consultation. During your phone consultation, our attorneys will provide you with immediate answers to your questions and schedule an appointment with one of our criminal defense attorneys.
 
CALL FOR A FREE PHONE CONSULTATION AT 616-459-6636.
 
 

MIRANDA WARNINGS - Miranda v. Arizona, 384 U.S. 436, 86 S.Ct. 1602, 16 L.Ed.2d 694 (1966)

There are two elements required for Miranda Warnings to apply.  First, the Defendant must be in custody (not free to leave).  Second, there must be interrogation (asking questions). 
 
The federal and state constitutions provide that no person can be compelled to be a witness against himself in a criminal trial. Miranda warnings are required when a person is interrogated by police while in custody or otherwise deprived of freedom of action in any significant manner. People v. Roark, 214 Mich.App. 421, 543 N.W.2d 23 (1995). To determine whether a defendant was “in custody” at the time of the interrogation, we look at the totality of the circumstances, with the key question being whether the defendant *383 reasonably believed that he was not free to leave.
 
Any interview of one suspected of a crime by a police officer will have coercive aspects to it, simply by virtue of the fact that the police officer is part of a law enforcement system which may ultimately cause the suspect to be charged with a crime. But police officers are not required to administer Miranda warnings to everyone whom they question.*384 Nor is the requirement of warnings to be imposed simply because the questioning takes place in the station house, or because the questioned person is one whom the police suspect. Miranda warnings are required only where there has been such a restriction on a person's freedom as to render him “in custody.” It was that sort of coercive environment to which Miranda by its terms was made applicable, and to which it is limited.

The Supreme Court’s decision in Miranda v. Arizona addressed four different cases involving custodial interrogations.  In each of these cases, the defendant was questioned by police officers, detectives, or a prosecuting attorney in a room in which he was cut off from the outside world.  In none of these cases was the defendant given a full and effective warning of his rights at the outset of the interrogation process.  In all the cases, the questioning elicited oral admissions and, in three of them, signed statements that were admitted at trial.

  • Miranda v. Arizona:  Miranda was arrested at his home and taken in custody to a police station where he was identified by the complaining witness.  He was then interrogated by two police officers for two hours, which resulted in a signed, written confession.  At trial, the oral and written confessions were presented to the jury.  Miranda was found guilty of kidnapping and rape and was sentenced to 20-30 years imprisonment on each count.  On appeal, the Supreme Court of Arizona held that Miranda’s constitutional rights were not violated in obtaining the confession.
  • Vignera v. New York:  Vignera was picked up by New York police in connection with the robbery of a dress shop that had occurred three days prior.  He was first taken to the 17th  Detective Squad headquarters. He was then taken to the 66th  Detective Squad, where he orally admitted the robbery and was placed under formal arrest.  He was then taken to the 70th  Precinct for detention, where he was questioned by an assistant district attorney in the presence of a hearing reporter who transcribed the questions and answers.  At trial, the oral confession and the transcript were presented to the jury.  Vignera was found guilty of first degree robbery and sentenced to 30-60 years imprisonment.  The conviction was affirmed without opinion by the Appellate Division and the Court of Appeals.
  • Westover v. United States:  Westover was arrested by local police in Kansas City as a suspect in two Kansas City robberies and taken to a local police station.  A report was also received from the FBI that Westover was wanted on a felony charge in California.  Westover was interrogated the night of the arrest and the next morning by local police.  Then, FBI agents continued the interrogation at the station.  After two-and-a-half hours of interrogation by the FBI, Westover signed separate confessions, which had been prepared by one of the agents during the interrogation, to each of the two robberies in California.  These statements were introduced at trial.  Westover was convicted of the California robberies and sentenced to 15 years’ imprisonment on each count.  The conviction was affirmed by the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.
  • California v. Stewart: In the course of investigating a series of purse-snatch robberies in which one of the victims died of injuries inflicted by her assailant, Stewart was identified as the endorser of checks stolen in one of the robberies.  Steward was arrested at his home.  Police also arrested Stewart’s wife and three other people who were visiting him.  Stewart was placed in a cell, and, over the next five days, was interrogated on nine different occasions.  During the ninth interrogation session, Stewart stated that he had robbed the deceased, but had not meant to hurt her.  At that time, police released the four other people arrested with Stewart because there was no evidence to connect any of them with the crime.  At trial, Stewart’s statements were introduced.  Stewart was convicted of robbery and first-degree murder and sentenced to death.  The Supreme Court of California reversed, holding that Stewart should have been advised of his right to remain silent and his right to counsel.   

Issues:

Whether “statements obtained from an individual who is subjected to custodial police interrogation” are admissible against him in a criminal trial and whether “procedures which assure that the individual is accorded his privilege under the Fifth Amendment to the Constitution not to be compelled to incriminate himself” are necessary.

Supreme Court holding:

The Court held that “there can be no doubt that the Fifth Amendment privilege is available outside of criminal court proceedings and serves to protect persons in all settings in which their freedom of action is curtailed in any significant way from being compelled to incriminate themselves.”  As such, “the prosecution may not use statements, whether exculpatory or inculpatory, stemming from custodial interrogation of the defendant unless it demonstrates the use of procedural safeguards effective to secure the privilege against self-incrimination.  By custodial interrogation, we mean questioning initiated by law enforcement officers after a person has been taken into custody or otherwise deprived of his freedom of action in any significant way.”

The Court further held that “without proper safeguards the process of in-custody interrogation of persons suspected or accused of crime contains inherently compelling pressures which work to undermine the individual’s will to resist and to compel him to speak where he would otherwise do so freely.”  Therefore, a defendant “must be warned prior to any questioning that he has the right to remain silent, that anything he says can be used against him in a court of law, that he has the right to the presence of an attorney, and that if he cannot afford an attorney one will be appointed for him prior to any questioning if he so desires.”

The Supreme Court reversed the judgment of the Supreme Court of Arizona in Miranda, reversed the judgment of the New York Court of Appeals in Vignera, reversed the judgment of the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in Westover, and affirmed the judgment of the Supreme Court of California in Stewart.

Argued: Feb. 28, March 1 and 2, 1966

Decided: June 13, 1966

Vote: 5-4

Majority opinion written by Chief Justice Warren and joined by Justices Black, Douglas, Brennan, and Fortas.

Dissenting opinion written by Justice Harlan and joined by Justices Stewart and White.

Dissenting in part opinion written by Justice Clark.

 

GRAND RAPIDS CRIMINAL DEFENSE ATTORNEYS

If you are facing a serious criminal charge, a good criminal defense attorney is not optional, it is a requirement! Our arson defense attorneys can answer your questions with straight talk. Having the right criminal defense attorney on your side can relieve your stress during this difficult situation. Our criminal defense attorneys have over 85 years of defense experience. George Krupp is a former Kent County assistant prosecutor and current criminal defense attorney. Christian Krupp is a former Jackson County assistant prosecutor and current criminal defense attorney. Between the two criminal defense attorneys, they can provide you with excellent criminal defense representation. Both attorneys have extensive criminal defense trial experience.
Krupp Law Offices P.C. is located in downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan. We represent clients in all criminal matters throughout West Michigan, including the cities of Grand Rapids, Holland, and Grand Haven, and the counties of Kent, Ottawa, Allegan, Barry, Newaygo, Montcalm, Muskegon, and Ionia.
 
 
Our office can help.
 
 
161 Ottawa NW Suite 404
Grand Rapids MI 49503
616-459-6636or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
 
 
 

GRAND RAPIDS CRIMINAL DEFENSE ATTORNEY - ROBBERY

When you are facing serious criminal charges such as robbery or car jacking in the Grand Rapids area, it is important to have the representation of a good criminal defense lawyer. Krupp Law Offices P.C. has been providing quality criminal defense for over 85 years. If you are facing criminal charges or are being investigated for robbery or car jacking, call the criminal defense attorneys at Krupp Law Offices P.C. for a free phone consultation. During your phone consultation, our attorneys will provide you with immediate answers to your questions and schedule an appointment with one of our criminal defense attorneys.

 

CALL FOR A FREE PHONE CONSULTATION AT 616-459-6636.

 

ROBBERY | CAR JACKING MCLA 750.529

MCLA 750.529 Use or possession of dangerous weapon; aggravated assault; penalty.

Sec. 529.

A person who engages in conduct proscribed under section 530 and who in the course of engaging in that conduct, possesses a dangerous weapon or an article used or fashioned in a manner to lead any person present to reasonably believe the article is a dangerous weapon, or who represents orally or otherwise that he or she is in possession of a dangerous weapon, is guilty of a felony punishable by imprisonment for life or for any term of years. If an aggravated assault or serious injury is inflicted by any person while violating this section, the person shall be sentenced to a minimum term of imprisonment of not less than 2 years.

 

MCLA 750.529a Carjacking; felony; penalty; “in the course of committing a larceny of a motor vehicle” defined; consecutive sentence.

Sec. 529a.

(1) A person who in the course of committing a larceny of a motor vehicle uses force or violence or the threat of force or violence, or who puts in fear any operator, passenger, or person in lawful possession of the motor vehicle, or any person lawfully attempting to recover the motor vehicle, is guilty of carjacking, a felony punishable by imprisonment for life or for any term of years.

(2) As used in this section, “in the course of committing a larceny of a motor vehicle” includes acts that occur in an attempt to commit the larceny, or during commission of the larceny, or in flight or attempted flight after the commission of the larceny, or in an attempt to retain possession of the motor vehicle.

(3) A sentence imposed for a violation of this section may be imposed to run consecutively to any other sentence imposed for a conviction that arises out of the same transaction.

 

MCLA 750.530 Larceny of money or other property; felony; penalty; “in the course of committing a larceny” defined.

Sec. 530.

(1) A person who, in the course of committing a larceny of any money or other property that may be the subject of larceny, uses force or violence against any person who is present, or who assaults or puts the person in fear, is guilty of a felony punishable by imprisonment for not more than 15 years.

(2) As used in this section, “in the course of committing a larceny” includes acts that occur in an attempt to commit the larceny, or during commission of the larceny, or in flight or attempted flight after the commission of the larceny, or in an attempt to retain possession of the property.

 

MCLA 750.531 Bank, safe and vault robbery.

Sec. 531.

Bank, safe and vault robbery—Any person who, with intent to commit the crime of larceny, or any felony, shall confine, maim, injure or wound, or attempt, or threaten to confine, kill, maim, injure or wound, or shall put in fear any person for the purpose of stealing from any building, bank, safe or other depository of money, bond or other valuables, or shall by intimidation, fear or threats compel, or attempt to compel any person to disclose or surrender the means of opening any building, bank, safe, vault or other depository of money, bonds, or other valuables, or shall attempt to break, burn, blow up or otherwise injure or destroy any safe, vault or other depository of money, bonds or other valuables in any building or place, shall, whether he succeeds or fails in the perpetration of such larceny or felony, be guilty of a felony, punishable by imprisonment in the state prison for life or any term of years.

 

GRAND RAPIDS ROBBERY DEFENSE ATTORNEY

If you are facing a felony or a misdemeanor, a good robbery defense attorney is not optional, it is a requirement! Our criminal defense attorneys can answer your questions with straight talk. Having the right criminal defense attorney on your side can relieve your stress during this difficult situation. Our criminal defense attorneys have over 85 years of criminal defense experience. George Krupp is a former Kent County assistant prosecutor and current criminal defense attorney. Christian Krupp is a former Jackson County assistant prosecutor and current criminal defense attorney. Between the two criminal defense attorneys, they can provide you with excellent criminal defense representation. Both attorneys have extensive criminal defense trial experience including robbery, car jacking, and other serious crimes.

Krupp Law Offices P.C. is located in downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan and has the right criminal defense attorney for you. We represent clients in all criminal matters throughout West Michigan, including the cities of Grand Rapids, Holland, and Grand Haven, and the counties of Kent, Ottawa, Allegan, Barry, Newaygo, Montcalm, Muskegon, and Ionia.

 

Call for a free phone consulation.  Our office can help.

KRUPP LAW OFFICES P.C.

161 Ottawa NW Suite 404

Grand Rapids MI 49503

616-459-6636 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

ASK A GRAND RAPIDS ROBBERY CRIMINAL DEFENSE ATTORNEY A QUESTION

GRAND RAPIDS CRIMINAL DEFENSE ATTORNEYS - RECEIVING AND CONCEALING STOLEN PROPERTY

When you are facing serious criminal charges such as receiving and concealing stolen property in the Grand Rapids area, it is important to have the representation of a good criminal defense lawyer. Krupp Law Offices P.C. has been providing quality criminal defense for over 85 years. If you are facing criminal charges or are being investigated for receiving and concealing stolen property, call the criminal defense attorneys at Krupp Law Offices P.C. for a free phone consultation. During your phone consultation, our attorneys will provide you with immediate answers to your questions and schedule an appointment with one of our criminal defense attorneys.
 
CALL FOR A FREE  PHONE CONSULTATION AT 616-459-6636.

 

RECEIVING AND CONCEALING STOLEN PROPERTY

 

MCLA 750.535 Buying, receiving, possessing, concealing, or aiding in concealment of stolen, embezzled, or converted property or motor vehicle; violation; penalty; rebuttable presumption; enhanced sentence based on prior convictions; prohibited defense.

 
Sec. 535.
(1) A person shall not buy, receive, possess, conceal, or aid in the concealment of stolen, embezzled, or converted money, goods, or property knowing, or having reason to know or reason to believe, that the money, goods, or property is stolen, embezzled, or converted.
(2) If any of the following apply, a person who violates subsection (1) is guilty of a felony punishable by imprisonment for not more than 10 years or a fine of not more than $15,000.00 or 3 times the value of the property purchased, received, possessed, or concealed, whichever is greater, or both imprisonment and a fine:
(a) The property purchased, received, possessed, or concealed has a value of $20,000.00 or more.
(b) The property purchased, received, possessed, or concealed has a value of $1,000.00 or more but less than $20,000.00, and the person has 2 or more prior convictions for committing or attempting to commit an offense under this section. For purposes of this subdivision, however, a prior conviction does not include a conviction for a violation or attempted violation of subsection (4)(b) or (5).
(3) If any of the following apply, a person who violates subsection (1) is guilty of a felony punishable by imprisonment for not more than 5 years or a fine of not more than $10,000.00 or 3 times the value of the property purchased, received, possessed, or concealed, whichever is greater, or both imprisonment and a fine:
(a) The property purchased, received, possessed, or concealed has a value of $1,000.00 or more but less than $20,000.00.
(b) The property purchased, received, possessed, or concealed has a value of $200.00 or more but less than $1,000.00, and the person has 1 or more prior convictions for committing or attempting to commit an offense under this section. For purposes of this subdivision, however, a prior conviction does not include a conviction for a violation or attempted violation of subsection (4)(b) or (5).
(4) If any of the following apply, a person who violates subsection (1) is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 1 year or a fine of not more than $2,000.00 or 3 times the value of the property purchased, received, possessed, or concealed, whichever is greater, or both imprisonment and a fine:
(a) The property purchased, received, possessed, or concealed has a value of $200.00 or more but less than $1,000.00.
(b) The property purchased, received, possessed, or concealed has a value of less than $200.00, and the person has 1 or more prior convictions for committing or attempting to commit an offense under this section or a local ordinance substantially corresponding to this section.
(5) If the property purchased, received, possessed, or concealed has a value of less than $200.00, a person who violates subsection (1) is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 93 days or a fine of not more than $500.00 or 3 times the value of the property purchased, received, possessed, or concealed, whichever is greater, or both imprisonment and a fine.
(6) The values of property purchased, received, possessed, or concealed in separate incidents pursuant to a scheme or course of conduct within any 12-month period may be aggregated to determine the total value of property purchased, received, possessed, or concealed.
(7) A person shall not buy, receive, possess, conceal, or aid in the concealment of a stolen motor vehicle knowing, or having reason to know or reason to believe, that the motor vehicle is stolen, embezzled, or converted. A person who violates this subsection is guilty of a felony punishable by imprisonment for not more than 5 years or a fine of not more than $10,000.00 or 3 times the value of the motor vehicle purchased, received, possessed, or concealed, whichever is greater, or both imprisonment and a fine. A person who is charged with, convicted of, or punished for a violation of this subsection shall not be convicted of or punished for a violation of another provision of this section arising from the purchase, receipt, possession, concealment, or aiding in the concealment of the same motor vehicle. This subsection does not prohibit the person from being charged, convicted, or punished under any other applicable law.
(8) If the prosecuting attorney intends to seek an enhanced sentence based upon the defendant having 1 or more prior convictions, the prosecuting attorney shall include on the complaint and information a statement listing the prior conviction or convictions. The existence of the defendant's prior conviction or convictions shall be determined by the court, without a jury, at sentencing or at a separate hearing for that purpose before sentencing. The existence of a prior conviction may be established by any evidence relevant for that purpose, including, but not limited to, 1 or more of the following:
(a) A copy of the judgment of conviction.
(b) A transcript of a prior trial, plea-taking, or sentencing.
(c) Information contained in a presentence report.
(d) The defendant's statement.
(9) A person who is a dealer in or collector of merchandise or personal property, or the agent, employee, or representative of a dealer or collector of merchandise or personal property who fails to reasonably inquire whether the person selling or delivering the stolen, embezzled, or converted property to the dealer or collector has a legal right to do so or who buys or receives stolen, embezzled, or converted property that has a registration, serial, or other identifying number altered or obliterated on an external surface of the property, is presumed to have bought or received the property knowing the property is stolen, embezzled, or converted. This presumption is rebuttable.
(10) If the sentence for a conviction under this section is enhanced by 1 or more prior convictions, those prior convictions shall not be used to further enhance the sentence for the conviction pursuant to section 10, 11, or 12 of chapter IX of the code of criminal procedure, 1927 PA 175, MCL 769.10, 769.11, and 769.12.
(11) It is not a defense to a charge under this section that the property was not stolen, embezzled, or converted property at the time of the violation if the property was explicitly represented to the accused person as being stolen, embezzled, or converted property.
 
 

MCLA 750.535a Definitions; owning, operating, or conducting chop shop; aiding and abetting; felony; penalty; second or subsequent conviction; restitution; property subject to seizure or forfeiture; process; disposition of money seized; seizure without process; bond; duties of seizing law enforcement agency; return of property; hearing; notice to rightful owner; interest of secured party; return of property seized to rightful owner; sale of unclaimed stolen property; sale of forfeited property; distribution of proceeds; enhancement of law enforcement efforts; applicability of section.

 
Sec. 535a.
(1) As used in this section:
(a) "Bona fide purchaser for value" means a person who purchases property for value in good faith and without notice of any adverse claim to the property.
(b) "Chop shop" means any of the following:
(i) Any area, building, storage lot, field, or other premises or place where 1 or more persons are engaged or have engaged in altering, dismantling, reassembling, or in any way concealing or disguising the identity of a stolen motor vehicle or of any major component part of a stolen motor vehicle.
(ii) Any area, building, storage lot, field, or other premises or place where there are 3 or more stolen motor vehicles present or where there are major component parts from 3 or more stolen motor vehicles present.
(c) "Major component part" means 1 of the following parts of a motor vehicle:
(i) The engine.
(ii) The transmission.
(iii) The right or left front fender.
(iv) The hood.
(v) A door allowing entrance to or egress from the passenger compartment of the vehicle.
(vi) The front or rear bumper.
(vii) The right or left rear quarter panel.
(viii) The deck lid, tailgate, or hatchback.
(ix) The trunk floor pan.
(x) The cargo box of a pickup.
(xi) The frame, or if the vehicle has a unitized body, the supporting structure or structures that serve as the frame.
(xii) The cab of a truck.
(xiii) The body of a passenger vehicle.
(xiv) An airbag or airbag assembly.
(xv) A wheel or tire.
(xvi) Any other part of a motor vehicle that the secretary of state determines is comparable in design or function to any of the parts listed in subparagraphs (i) to (xv).
(d) "Motor vehicle" means either of the following:
(i) A device in, upon, or by which a person or property is or may be transported or drawn upon a highway that is self-propelled or that may be connected to and towed by a self-propelled device.
(ii) A land-based device that is self-propelled but not designed for use upon a highway, including, but not limited to, farm machinery, a bulldozer, or a steam shovel.
(2) Except as provided in subsection (3), a person who knowingly owns, operates, or conducts a chop shop or who knowingly aids and abets another person in owning, operating, or conducting a chop shop is guilty of a felony punishable by imprisonment for not more than 10 years or a fine of not more than $250,000.00, or both.
(3) Upon a second or subsequent conviction under this section, the person convicted may be imprisoned for not more than 10 years and shall be fined not less than $10,000.00 or more than $250,000.00, or both.
(4) In addition to any other punishment, a person convicted of violating this section shall be ordered to make restitution to the rightful owner of a stolen motor vehicle or of a stolen major component part, or to the owner's insurer if the owner has already been compensated for the loss by the insurer, for any financial loss sustained as a result of the theft of the motor vehicle or a major component part. Restitution shall be imposed in addition to, but not instead of, any imprisonment or fine imposed.
(5) All of the following are subject to seizure and, if a person is charged with a violation or attempted violation of subsection (2) and is convicted of a violation or attempted violation of subsection (2) or section 415, 416, 535, or 536a, subject to forfeiture:
(a) An engine, tool, machine, implement, device, chemical, or substance used or designed for altering, dismantling, reassembling, or in any other way concealing or disguising the identity of a stolen motor vehicle or any major component part.
(b) A stolen motor vehicle or major component part found at the site of a chop shop or a motor vehicle or major component part for which there is probable cause to believe that it is stolen.
(c) A wrecker, car hauler, or any other motor vehicle that is used or has been used to convey or transport a stolen motor vehicle or major component part.
(d) Any book, record, money, negotiable instrument, or other personal property or real property, except real property that is the primary residence of the spouse or a dependent child of the owner, that is or has been used in a chop shop operation.
(6) Except as provided in subsection (7), property described in subsection (5) may be seized by a state or local law enforcement agency upon process issued by the recorder's court of the city of Detroit or the district or circuit court having jurisdiction over the property. Seizure without process may be made in any of the following cases:
(a) The seizure is incident to an arrest or pursuant to a search warrant or an inspection under an administrative inspection warrant.
(b) The property subject to seizure has been the subject of a prior judgment in favor of this state in a forfeiture proceeding based upon this section.
(c) Exigent circumstances exist that preclude obtaining process and there is probable cause to believe that the property was used or is intended to be used in violation of this section.
(7) To retain property for which seizure and forfeiture are sought under this section pending the forfeiture hearing, a licensed used or secondhand vehicle parts dealer or the owner may post a bond in the amount of 1-1/2 times the value of the property. This subsection does not apply to a motor vehicle or major component part that is to be used as evidence in a criminal proceeding.
(8) If property other than real property is seized under subsection (6), the seizing law enforcement agency shall do 1 or more of the following, subject to subsection (10):
(a) Place the property under seal.
(b) Remove the property to a designated storage area.
(c) Petition the district or circuit court to appoint a custodian to take custody of the property and to remove it to an appropriate location for disposition in accordance with law.
(9) The seizing agency may deposit money seized under subsection (8) into an interest-bearing account in a financial institution. As used in this subsection, "financial institution" means a state or nationally chartered bank or a state or federally chartered savings and loan association, savings bank, or credit union whose deposits are insured by an agency of the United States government and that maintains a principal office or branch office located in this state under the laws of this state or the United States.
(10) An attorney for a person who is charged with a violation of this section involving or related to money seized by a law enforcement agency under this section shall be afforded a period of 60 days within which to examine that money. This 60-day period shall begin to run after notice is given under subsection (12) but before the money is deposited into a financial institution under subsection (9). If the attorney general or prosecuting attorney fails to sustain his or her burden of proof in criminal proceedings under this section, the court shall order the return of the money, including any interest earned on money deposited into a financial institution under subsection (9).
(11) If property is seized without process under subsection (6), within 14 days after the seizure, the seizing agency shall return the property to the person from whom it was seized unless a hearing has been scheduled to determine whether the seizure was proper and reasonable notice of the hearing has been given.
(12) The rightful owner of any property that is to be forfeited under subsection (5) shall be served notice at least 10 days before the matter is to be heard regarding the forfeiture and, if the rightful owner did not know of and did not consent to the commission of the crime, the property shall be returned to the rightful owner. If the rightful owner of the property is not known or cannot be found, notice may be served by publishing notice of the forfeiture hearing not less than 10 days before the date of the hearing in a newspaper of general circulation in the county where the hearing is to be held. The notice shall contain a general description of the property and any serial or registration numbers on the property.
(13) A forfeiture of property encumbered by a bona fide security interest is subject to the interest of the secured party who did not know of or consent to the act or omission in violation of this section.
(14) Any property seized under subsection (6) that was stolen shall be returned to its rightful owner if that ownership can be established to the satisfaction of the seizing law enforcement agency. Any stolen property that is unclaimed after seizure may be sold as provided by law.
(15) Any property forfeited under this section may be sold pursuant to an order of the court. The proceeds of the sale shall be distributed by the court having jurisdiction over the forfeiture proceeding to the entity having budgetary authority over the seizing law enforcement agency. If more than 1 law enforcement agency was substantially involved in effecting the forfeiture, the court having jurisdiction over the forfeiture proceeding shall distribute equitably the proceeds of the sale among the entities having budgetary authority over the seizing law enforcement agencies. Twenty-five percent of the money received by an entity under this subsection shall be used to enhance law enforcement efforts pertaining to this section.
(16) This section does not apply to a person who is a bona fide purchaser for value of the motor vehicle or major component parts described in subsection (1).
 
 
MCLA 750.535b Transporting or shipping stolen firearm or stolen ammunition as felony; receiving, concealing, storing, bartering, selling, disposing of, pledging, or accepting as security for a loan a stolen firearm as felony; penalties.
Sec. 535b.
(1) A person who transports or ships a stolen firearm or stolen ammunition, knowing that the firearm or ammunition was stolen, is guilty of a felony, punishable by imprisonment for not more than 10 years or by a fine of not more than $5,000.00, or both.
(2) A person who receives, conceals, stores, barters, sells, disposes of, pledges, or accepts as security for a loan a stolen firearm or stolen ammunition, knowing that the firearm or ammunition was stolen, is guilty of a felony, punishable by imprisonment for not more than 10 years or by a fine of not more than $5,000.00, or both.
 

MCLA 750.536 Conviction for larceny not essential.

Sec. 536.
In any prosecution of the offense of buying, receiving or aiding in the concealment of stolen, embezzled or converted money or other property it shall not be necessary to aver, nor on the trial thereof to prove that the person who stole, embezzled or converted such property has been convicted.
 

MCLA 750.536a Rendering goods or property unidentifiable; possession or sale of goods or property with identifying number obscured, defaced, altered, obliterated, removed, destroyed, or otherwise concealed or disguised.

Sec. 536a.
(1) A person who obscures, defaces, alters, obliterates, removes, destroys, or otherwise conceals or disguises any registration, serial, or other identifying number embossed, engraved, carved, stamped, welded, or otherwise placed or situated in or upon goods or property held for sale in the ordinary course of business with the intent to render the goods or property unidentifiable shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.
(2) A person who is a dealer in or collector of any merchandise or personal property or the agent, employee, or representative of a dealer or collector and who possesses goods or property with the intent to sell the goods or property in the ordinary course of business knowing the registration, serial, or other identifying number has been obscured, defaced, altered, obliterated, removed, destroyed, or otherwise concealed or disguised shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.
(3) A person who is a dealer or collector of any merchandise or personal property or the agent, employee, or representative of a dealer or collector and who sells goods or property in the ordinary course of business knowing that the registration, serial, or other identifying number has been obscured, defaced, altered, obliterated, removed, destroyed, or otherwise concealed or disguised shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.
 

MCLA 750.537 Copper or silver ore; barter, transfer, or sale; memorandum of sale; certificate; applicability; violation as misdemeanor.

Sec. 537.
A person working in any copper or silver mine of this state, or any person in behalf of such person, shall not sell, barter, transfer, or ship any copper or silver ore, bullion, pig, or copper or silver in the raw or unmanufactured state, and shall not be a party to any barter, transfer, or sale, or aid or assist therein, unless a memorandum be filed with the county clerk of the county where the barter, transfer, or sale shall take place, giving the names of the parties making such barter, transfer, sale, or shipment, the dates, consideration, and the origin of the copper or silver so bartered, transferred, sold, or shipped, and in all cases where the origin of said copper or silver is not known to the parties, no barter, transfer, sale, or shipment shall be made without a certificate being attached to such memorandum of sale duly signed by the county clerk or by a constable or deputy sheriff, judge, stating in substance that he or she has investigated the source or origin of the copper or silver so to be bartered, transferred, sold, or shipped and that in his or her opinion the articles have not been stolen, and that the parties thereto have a right to transfer or sell the articles. This section does not apply to any person authorized to act in behalf of a person, firm, or corporation engaged in the business of mining copper or silver as owner. Any person violating the provisions of this section is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 1 year or a fine of not more than $1,000.00.
 
 

GRAND RAPIDS RECEIVING AND CONCEALING STOLEN PROPERTY DEFENSE ATTORNEY

 
If you are facing a felony or a misdemeanor, a good criminal defense attorney is not optional, it is a requirement! Our criminal defense attorneys can answer your questions with straight talk. Having the right criminal defense attorney on your side can relieve your stress during this difficult situation. Our criminal defense attorneys have over 85 years of criminal defense experience. George Krupp is a former Kent County assistant prosecutor and current criminal defense attorney. Christian Krupp is a former Jackson County assistant prosecutor and current criminal defense attorney. Between the two criminal defense attorneys, they can provide you with excellent criminal defense representation. Both attorneys have extensive criminal defense trial experience including receiving and concealing stolen property and other serious crimes.
Krupp Law Offices P.C. is located in downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan and has the right criminal defense attorney for you. We represent clients in all criminal matters throughout West Michigan, including the cities of Grand Rapids, Holland, and Grand Haven, and the counties of Kent, Ottawa, Allegan, Barry, Newaygo, Montcalm, Muskegon, and Ionia.
 
Call for a free phone consultation.  Our office can help.
 
 
161 Ottawa NW Suite 404
Grand Rapids MI 49503
616-459-6636 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.   
 
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GRAND RAPIDS CRIMINAL DEFENSE ATTORNEYS - PERJURY

When you are facing serious criminal charges such as perjury in the Grand Rapids area, it is important to have the representation of a good criminal defense lawyer. Krupp Law Offices P.C. has been providing quality criminal defense for over 85 years. If you are facing criminal charges or are being investigated for perjury, call the criminal defense attorneys at Krupp Law Offices P.C. for a free phone consultation. During your phone consultation, our attorneys will provide you with immediate answers to your questions and schedule an appointment with one of our criminal defense attorneys.

CALL FOR A FREE PHONE CONSULTATION AT 616-459-6636.

 

PERJURY MCLA 750.422

 

MCLA 750.422 Perjury committed in courts.

Sec. 422.

Perjury committed in courts—Any person who, being lawfully required to depose the truth in any proceeding in a court of justice, shall commit perjury shall be guilty of a felony, punishable, if such perjury was committed on the trial of an indictment for a capital crime, by imprisonment in the state prison for life, or any term of years, and if committed in any other case, by imprisonment in the state prison for not more than 15 years.

 

MCLA 750.422a Making intentional material false statement in petition as felony; penalty; consecutive terms of imprisonment.

Sec. 422a.

(1) An individual who intentionally makes a material false statement in a petition filed under section 16 of chapter X of the code of criminal procedure, 1927 PA 175, MCL 770.16, is guilty of a felony punishable by imprisonment for not more than 5 years or a fine of not more than $10,000.00, or both.

(2) The court may order a term of imprisonment imposed under this section to be served consecutively to any other term of imprisonment being served by the individual.

 

MCLA 750.423 Definition.

Sec. 423.

Definition—Any person authorized by any statute of this state to take an oath, or any person of whom an oath shall be required by law, who shall wilfully swear falsely, in regard to any matter or thing, respecting which such oath is authorized or required, shall be guilty of perjury, a felony, punishable by imprisonment in the state prison not more than 15 years.

 

MCLA 750.424 Subornation of perjury.

Sec. 424.

Subornation of perjury—Any person who shall be guilty of subornation of perjury, by procuring another person to commit the crime of perjury, shall be punished as provided in the next preceding section.

 

MCLA 750.425 Inciting or procuring one to commit perjury.

Sec. 425.

Inciting or procuring one to commit perjury—Any person who shall endeavor to incite or procure any person to commit the crime of perjury, though no perjury be committed, shall be guilty of a felony, punishable by imprisonment in the state prison not more than 5 years.

 

MCLA 750.426 Court reasonably believes perjury committed.

Sec. 426.

Proceeding when court reasonably believes perjury has been committed—Whenever it shall appear to any court of record that any witness or party who has been legally sworn and examined or has made an affidavit in any proceeding in a court of justice, has testified in such a manner as to induce a reasonable presumption that he has been guilty of perjury therein, the court may immediately commit such witness or party, by an order or process for that purpose, or may take a recognizance with sureties, for his appearing to answer to an indictment for perjury; and thereupon the witness to establish such perjury may, if present, be bound over to the proper court, and notice of the proceedings shall forthwith be given to the prosecuting attorney.

 

MCLA 750.427 Perjury trial; securing and detaining papers.

Sec. 427.

Securing and detaining papers, etc., necessary in perjury trial—If, in any proceeding in a court of justice, in which perjury shall be reasonably presumed, as aforesaid, any papers, books, or documents shall have been produced, which shall be deemed necessary to be used on any prosecution for such perjury, the court may, by order, detain the same from the person producing them so long as may be necessary in order to their being used in such prosecution.

 

GRAND RAPIDS PERJURY DEFENSE ATTORNEY

If you are facing a felony or a misdemeanor, a good criminal defense attorney is not optional, it is a requirement! Our criminal defense attorneys can answer your questions with straight talk. Having the right criminal defense attorney on your side can relieve your stress during this difficult situation. Our criminal defense attorneys have over 75 years of criminal defense experience. George Krupp is a former Kent County assistant prosecutor and current criminal defense attorney. Christian Krupp is a former Jackson County assistant prosecutor and current criminal defense attorney. Between the two criminal defense attorneys, they can provide you with excellent criminal defense representation. Both attorneys have extensive criminal defense trial experience including perjury and other serious crimes.

Krupp Law Offices P.C. is located in downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan and has the right criminal defense attorney for you. We represent clients in all criminal matters throughout West Michigan, including the cities of Grand Rapids, Holland, and Grand Haven, and the counties of Kent, Ottawa, Allegan, Barry, Newaygo, Montcalm, Muskegon, and Ionia.

 

Our office can help.

KRUPP LAW OFFICES P.C.

161 Ottawa NW Suite 404

Grand Rapids MI 49503

616-459-6636 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.   

 Criminal Attorney, Grand Rapids Criminal Defense Attorney, Criminal Attorneys, Grand Rapids Criminal Attorney, Grand Rapids Criminal Defense, Criminal Defense Attorney Grand Rapids, Criminal Lawyer Grand Rapids, Grand Rapids Criminal Defense Lawyers

CRIMINAL INTERVIEW PDF

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